Make your own free website on Tripod.com
Rea Genealogy - pafn68 - Generated by Personal Ancestral File

Ancestors of Gary Rea

Notes


Henry de Beaufort, Bishop of Lincoln, Bishop of Winchester, Cardinal of St. Eusebius

According to Weis, in "Ancestral Roots," Henry had "in his youth had an affair with Lady Alize Fitzalan," daughter of Sir Richard Fitzalan. This is disputed by some who contend that Henry "died celibate,"however, "celibate" does not mean "without issue" or "virginal." Henry wasn't born a clergyman, and didn't become one until later in life, after he and Alice Fitzalan had their affair. In addition to Weis, the LDS also confirms this. Burke, on the other hand, fails to list any offspring of Henry's and says that Henry's brother, Sir John de Beaufort, Earl of Somerset, was Jane's father. I tend to agree with Weis on this one.


Alice FitzAlan, Lady, of Arundel

A Papal dispensation was issued on 8 Mar 1325 to permit the Marriage of
Alice and John who are related in the 4th degree.


Richard FitzAlan, 10th Earl of Arundel & Surrey

According to Burke, Richard was "constituted admiral of the king's fleet in the westwards, and soon after that to the southwards, was retained by indenture to serve the king at sea for one quarter of a year, in the company of John, Duke of Lancaster, King of Castile. He was afterwards engaged for some years in Scotland." Burke goes on to say that Richard was "appointed admiral of the whole fleet, and putting to sea, encountered and vanquished the united fleets of France and Spain, taking no less than 100 ships, great and small, all laden with wines, comprising 19,000 tons. This gallant exploit he follwed up by entering the port of Brest, and reducing one its castles and burning the other. He now returned to England in great triumph, but had to encounter the jealousy and hatred of the king's favorites, particularly of the Duke of Ireland, whose influence over the king he strenuously resisted." Burke continues, saying that Richard "entered into the confederation of the Earls of Derby and Warwick, which assembled in arms at Haringhay Park (now Hornsey), in Middlesex, and compelled the king to acquiesce in their views. He was then, by the general consent of parliament (11th Richard II), made governor of the castle and town of Brest, and shortly after captain-general of the king's fleet at sea, with commission to treat of peace with John de Montfort, then Duke of Britainy; whereupon hoisting his flag, soon after met with the enemy, of whose ships he sunk and took fourscore; entered the Isle of Rhe, which he burnt and spoiled, and several other ports which he likewise plundered, putting to flight all the French and Britons that made any resistance. From this memorable period of Lord Arundel, little is known of him, until the 15th Richard, when the king regaining his power, summoned parliament at Westminster, and dismissed several of the great officers of state, amongst whom his lordship was removed from his command as admiral; and in two years afterwards, the parliament then sitting, he was accused of treason by the Duke of Lancaster, but escaped for the moment, and sought to retire from public life." Burke goes on to say that Richard was then imprisoned on the Isle of Wight by the king, where he was tried and sentenced to hang as a traitor. Burke says the sentence was "somewhat mitigated, and the gallant nobleman was simply beheaded at Cheapside, in the city of London."


Richard FitzAlan, 10th Earl of Arundel & Surrey

According to Burke, Richard was "constituted admiral of the king's fleet in the westwards, and soon after that to the southwards, was retained by indenture to serve the king at sea for one quarter of a year, in the company of John, Duke of Lancaster, King of Castile. He was afterwards engaged for some years in Scotland." Burke goes on to say that Richard was "appointed admiral of the whole fleet, and putting to sea, encountered and vanquished the united fleets of France and Spain, taking no less than 100 ships, great and small, all laden with wines, comprising 19,000 tons. This gallant exploit he follwed up by entering the port of Brest, and reducing one its castles and burning the other. He now returned to England in great triumph, but had to encounter the jealousy and hatred of the king's favorites, particularly of the Duke of Ireland, whose influence over the king he strenuously resisted." Burke continues, saying that Richard "entered into the confederation of the Earls of Derby and Warwick, which assembled in arms at Haringhay Park (now Hornsey), in Middlesex, and compelled the king to acquiesce in their views. He was then, by the general consent of parliament (11th Richard II), made governor of the castle and town of Brest, and shortly after captain-general of the king's fleet at sea, with commission to treat of peace with John de Montfort, then Duke of Britainy; whereupon hoisting his flag, soon after met with the enemy, of whose ships he sunk and took fourscore; entered the Isle of Rhe, which he burnt and spoiled, and several other ports which he likewise plundered, putting to flight all the French and Britons that made any resistance. From this memorable period of Lord Arundel, little is known of him, until the 15th Richard, when the king regaining his power, summoned parliament at Westminster, and dismissed several of the great officers of state, amongst whom his lordship was removed from his command as admiral; and in two years afterwards, the parliament then sitting, he was accused of treason by the Duke of Lancaster, but escaped for the moment, and sought to retire from public life." Burke goes on to say that Richard was then imprisoned on the Isle of Wight by the king, where he was tried and sentenced to hang as a traitor. Burke says the sentence was "somewhat mitigated, and the gallant nobleman was simply beheaded at Cheapside, in the city of London."


Richard FitzAlan, 9th Earl of Arundel

According to Burke, Richard was made Earl of Arundel by King Edward III. He was afterward made governor of Chirke Castle in Denbigh, and inherited the castle the next year, along with all its lands, part of which had been owned by Roger de Mortimer, Earl of March. Richard was soonafter made governor of Porchester Castle. Following this, he was given a command in Scotland for some years, after which he was made admiral of the western seas and governor of Caernarvon Castle in Wales. He "embarked in the French wars, and participated in the glories of the subsequent campaigns." H e was "at the seige of Vannes, the relief of Thouars, and the immortal battle of Creasy." Burke goes on to say that Richard was "frequently employed in diplomatic missions of the first importance, and was esteemed one of the most emminent generals and statesmen of the era in which he lived."


Eleanor de Lancaster Plantagenet

The Complete Peerage vol.VII,p.401,note b.


Edmund FitzAlan, 8th Earl of Arundel

Was made a knight during the reign of Edward I, "Longshanks". He was, according to Burke, "constantly engaged in the wars of Scotland." But, says Burke, "he was afterwards involved in the treason of Thomas, Earl of Lancaster, yet not greatly to his predjudice, for, in the 10th Edward II, his lordship was constituted lieutenant and captain-general to the king from the Trent northwards, as far as Roxbourough in Scotland, and for several years subsequently, he continued one of the commanders of the English army in Scotland, in which service he so distinguised himself that he obtained a grant from the crown of the confiscated property of Lord Badlesmere, in the city of London and the county of Salop, as well as the escheated lands of John, Lord Mowbray, in the Isle of Axholme, and several manors and castles, part of the possessions (also forfeited) of Roger, Lord Mortimer, of Wigmore. But those royal grants led, eventually, to the earl's ruin; for after the fall of the unhappy Edward into the hands of his enemies, Lord Arundel, who was implacably hated by the queen and Mortimer, suffered death by decapitation at Hereford in 1326."


John FitzAlan, 5th Earl of Arundel

The confiscated Arundel Castle, taken from Hugh de Albini, Earl of Arundel by Henry III, was given to John and he thus became the 5th Earl of Arundel. He was afterward made, according to Burke, "captain-general of all the forces designed for guarding the Welsh marches, and in the baronial war, he appears to have sided with the barons, and soon afterwards with the king."


John FitzAlan, 4th Earl of Arundel

According to Burke, John "took up arms with the other barons," but, "upon accession of King Henry, having had letters of safe conduct to come in and make his peace, he had livery of the lands of his inheritance, upon paying, however, a fine of 10,000 marks."


William Fitzalan, Sheriff of Shropshire

Served as Sherrif of Shropshire from the reign of Richard I until the reign of King John.